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03:42

Erik Rapp - No Reason

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Video Director: Robin Kempe-Bergman Video producer: Robinovich Music video by Erik Rapp performing No Reason. (C) 2017 Universal Music AB ...

03:45

Erik og Kriss - Superhelt ft. Serlina

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Music video by Erik og Kriss performing Superhelt. (C) 2016 Erik Og Kriss, under exclusive license to Caroline International / Universal Music http://vevo.ly/oltfe5.

02:51

Erik Mongrain - PercusienFa

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Streaming on twitch every sunday/thursday, 1-3 pm (eastern). Best place to hear new tunes, talk with me, ask questions or just have a good time :) Links!

02:47

Millencolin - No Cigar

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Track Number 1 of the album called PennyBridge Pioneers. LYRICS: Tell us where you're from, what you want to become. And we'll say if you're OK. Where did ...

04:25

Erik Satie - Gnossienne No.3

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  • 7 tháng trước
Alfred Eric Leslie Satie (Honfleur, 17 May 1866 -- Paris, 1 July 1925) was a French composer and pianist. Starting with his first composition in 1884, he signed ...

03:04

Erik Hassle - Hurtful (HQ)

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  • 6 tháng trước
Erik Hassle - Hurtful (HQ) 2010 Artist Company TEN AB Find it on iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/se/album/pieces/id348945529?l=en Follow Erik Hassle on ...

03:43

Jon Gomm - Dance Of The Last Rhino

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Download the song for a penny, only from http://jongomm.com/downloads (offer ends soon!) Get the Guitar Tab at http://jongomm.com/guitar-tabs 10% of all ...

02:23

Millencolin - Material Boy

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Track Number 3 of the album called PennyBridge Pioneers. LYRICS: I'm leaving the Wat, to Buddhism no longer loyal. I'm breaking my heart, as my compassion ...

03:37

Erik Satie - Gymnopédie No.1

Thomas

  • 46 lượt xem
  • 1 năm trước
Alfred Eric Leslie Satie (Honfleur, 17 May 1866 -- Paris, 1 July 1925) was a French composer and pianist. Starting with his first composition in 1884, he signed his name as Erik Satie.

Satie was introduced as a "gymnopedist" in 1887, shortly before writing his most famous compositions, the Gymnopédies. Later, he also referred to himself as a "phonometrograph" or "phonometrician" (meaning "someone who measures (and writes down) sounds") preferring this designation to that of "musician," after having been called "a clumsy but subtle technician" in a book on contemporary French composers published in 1911.

In addition to his body of music, Satie also left a remarkable set of writings, having contributed work for a range of publications, from the dadaist 391 to the American Vanity Fair. Although in later life he prided himself on always publishing his work under his own name, in the late nineteenth century he appears to have used pseudonyms such as Virginie Lebeau and François de Paule in some of his published writings.

Satie was a colourful figure in the early 20th century Parisian avant-garde. He was a precursor to later artistic movements such as minimalism, repetitive music and the Theatre of the Absurd.
The Gymnopédies, published in Paris starting in 1888, are three piano compositions written by French composer and pianist, Erik Satie.

These short, atmospheric pieces are written in 3/4 time, with each sharing a common theme and structure. Collectively, the Gymnopedies are regarded as the precursors to modern ambient music[citation needed] - gentle yet somewhat eccentric pieces which, when composed, defied the classical tradition. For instance, the first few bars feature a disjunct chordal theme in the bass - first, a G-major 7th in the bass, and then a B-minor chord, also in the lower register. Then comes the one-note theme in D major. Although the collection of chords at first seems too complex to be harmonious, the melody soon imbues the work with a soothing atmospheric quality.

Satie himself used the term "furniture music" to refer to some of his pieces, implying they could be used as mood-setting background music. However, Satie used this term to refer to only some of his later, 20th century compositions, without specific reference to the Gymnopédies as background music. From the second half of the 20th century on, the Gymnopédies were often erroneously described as part of Satie's body of furniture music, perhaps due to John Cage's interpretation of them.
[from Wikipedia]

Artwork:Leonora Carrington "The Temptation of st.Anthony"
Played by:Daniel Varsano, Philippe Entremont

04:55

Erik Satie - Gymnopédie No.3

Music moods

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  • 12 tháng trước
Alfred Eric Leslie Satie (Honfleur, 17 May 1866 -- Paris, 1 July 1925) was a French composer and pianist. Starting with his first composition in 1884, he signed his name as Erik Satie.

Satie was introduced as a "gymnopedist" in 1887, shortly before writing his most famous compositions, the Gymnopédies. Later, he also referred to himself as a "phonometrograph" or "phonometrician" (meaning "someone who measures (and writes down) sounds") preferring this designation to that of "musician," after having been called "a clumsy but subtle technician" in a book on contemporary French composers published in 1911.

In addition to his body of music, Satie also left a remarkable set of writings, having contributed work for a range of publications, from the dadaist 391 to the American Vanity Fair. Although in later life he prided himself on always publishing his work under his own name, in the late nineteenth century he appears to have used pseudonyms such as Virginie Lebeau and François de Paule in some of his published writings.

Satie was a colourful figure in the early 20th century Parisian avant-garde. He was a precursor to later artistic movements such as minimalism, repetitive music and the Theatre of the Absurd.
The Gymnopédies, published in Paris starting in 1888, are three piano compositions written by French composer and pianist, Erik Satie.

These short, atmospheric pieces are written in 3/4 time, with each sharing a common theme and structure. Collectively, the Gymnopedies are regarded as the precursors to modern ambient music[citation needed] - gentle yet somewhat eccentric pieces which, when composed, defied the classical tradition. For instance, the first few bars feature a disjunct chordal theme in the bass - first, a G-major 7th in the bass, and then a B-minor chord, also in the lower register. Then comes the one-note theme in D major. Although the collection of chords at first seems too complex to be harmonious, the melody soon imbues the work with a soothing atmospheric quality.

Satie himself used the term "furniture music" to refer to some of his pieces, implying they could be used as mood-setting background music. However, Satie used this term to refer to only some of his later, 20th century compositions, without specific reference to the Gymnopédies as background music. From the second half of the 20th century on, the Gymnopédies were often erroneously described as part of Satie's body of furniture music, perhaps due to John Cage's interpretation of them.
[from Wikipedia]

Performed by:Reinbert de Leeuw
Artwork:Remedios Varo

03:25

Erik Satie - Gnossienne No.1

Thomas

  • 37 lượt xem
  • 1 năm trước
Alfred Eric Leslie Satie (Honfleur, 17 May 1866 -- Paris, 1 July 1925) was a French composer and pianist. Starting with his first composition in 1884, he signed his name as Erik Satie.

Satie was introduced as a "gymnopedist" in 1887, shortly before writing his most famous compositions, the Gymnopédies. Later, he also referred to himself as a "phonometrograph" or "phonometrician" (meaning "someone who measures (and writes down) sounds") preferring this designation to that of "musician," after having been called "a clumsy but subtle technician" in a book on contemporary French composers published in 1911.

In addition to his body of music, Satie also left a remarkable set of writings, having contributed work for a range of publications, from the dadaist 391 to the American Vanity Fair. Although in later life he prided himself on always publishing his work under his own name, in the late nineteenth century he appears to have used pseudonyms such as Virginie Lebeau and François de Paule in some of his published writings.

Satie was a colourful figure in the early 20th century Parisian avant-garde. He was a precursor to later artistic movements such as minimalism, repetitive music and the Theatre of the Absurd.

"Gnossienne" is the name given to several piano pieces by French composer Erik Satie in the late 19th century.
Satie's coining of the word "gnossienne" was one of the rare occasions when a composer used a new term to indicate a new "type" of composition. Satie had and would use many novel names for his compositions; for example, "ogive" had been the name of an architectural element until Satie used it as the name for a composition, the Ogives Similarly with "vexations", "croquis et agaceries" and so on—but "gnossienne" was a word that did not exist before Satie used it to indicate a composition. "Gnossienne" appears to be derived from the word gnosis; Satie was involved in gnostic sects and movements at the time that he began to compose the Gnossiennes. However, some published versions claim that the word derives from Cretan "knossos" or "gnossus" and link the Gnossiennes to Theseus, Ariadne and the Minotaur myth.

The Gnossiennes were composed by Satie in the decade following the composition of the Trois Sarabandes (1887) and the Trois Gymnopédies (1888). Like these Sarabandes and Gymnopédies, the Gnossiennes are often considered dances. It is not certain that this qualification comes from Satie himself—the sarabande and the Gymnopaedia were at least historically known as dances.

The musical vocabulary of the Gnossiennes is a continuation of that of the Gymnopédies (a development that had started with the 1886 Ogives → Sarabandes → Gymnopédies → Gnossiennes) later leading to more harmonic experimentation in compositions like the Danses Gothiques. These series of compositions are all at the core of Satie's characteristic 19th century style, and in this sense differ from his early salon compositions (like the 1885 "Waltz" compositions published in 1887), his turn-of-the-century cabaret compositions (like the Je te Veux Waltz), and his post-Schola Cantorum piano solo compositions, starting with the Préludes flasques in 1912.
[from Wikipedia]

Artwork:Remedios Varo
Played by:Daniel Varsano

03:37

Erik Satie - Gymnopédie No.1

Music moods

  • 1 lượt xem
  • 12 tháng trước
Alfred Eric Leslie Satie (Honfleur, 17 May 1866 -- Paris, 1 July 1925) was a French composer and pianist. Starting with his first composition in 1884, he signed his name as Erik Satie.

Satie was introduced as a "gymnopedist" in 1887, shortly before writing his most famous compositions, the Gymnopédies. Later, he also referred to himself as a "phonometrograph" or "phonometrician" (meaning "someone who measures (and writes down) sounds") preferring this designation to that of "musician," after having been called "a clumsy but subtle technician" in a book on contemporary French composers published in 1911.

In addition to his body of music, Satie also left a remarkable set of writings, having contributed work for a range of publications, from the dadaist 391 to the American Vanity Fair. Although in later life he prided himself on always publishing his work under his own name, in the late nineteenth century he appears to have used pseudonyms such as Virginie Lebeau and François de Paule in some of his published writings.

Satie was a colourful figure in the early 20th century Parisian avant-garde. He was a precursor to later artistic movements such as minimalism, repetitive music and the Theatre of the Absurd.
The Gymnopédies, published in Paris starting in 1888, are three piano compositions written by French composer and pianist, Erik Satie.

These short, atmospheric pieces are written in 3/4 time, with each sharing a common theme and structure. Collectively, the Gymnopedies are regarded as the precursors to modern ambient music[citation needed] - gentle yet somewhat eccentric pieces which, when composed, defied the classical tradition. For instance, the first few bars feature a disjunct chordal theme in the bass - first, a G-major 7th in the bass, and then a B-minor chord, also in the lower register. Then comes the one-note theme in D major. Although the collection of chords at first seems too complex to be harmonious, the melody soon imbues the work with a soothing atmospheric quality.

Satie himself used the term "furniture music" to refer to some of his pieces, implying they could be used as mood-setting background music. However, Satie used this term to refer to only some of his later, 20th century compositions, without specific reference to the Gymnopédies as background music. From the second half of the 20th century on, the Gymnopédies were often erroneously described as part of Satie's body of furniture music, perhaps due to John Cage's interpretation of them.
[from Wikipedia]

Artwork:Leonora Carrington "The Temptation of st.Anthony"
Played by:Daniel Varsano, Philippe Entremont

03:37

Erik Satie - Gymnopédie No.1

vietbigbrother

  • 0 lượt xem
  • 12 tháng trước
Alfred Eric Leslie Satie (Honfleur, 17 May 1866 -- Paris, 1 July 1925) was a French composer and pianist. Starting with his first composition in 1884, he signed his name as Erik Satie.

Satie was introduced as a "gymnopedist" in 1887, shortly before writing his most famous compositions, the Gymnopédies. Later, he also referred to himself as a "phonometrograph" or "phonometrician" (meaning "someone who measures (and writes down) sounds") preferring this designation to that of "musician," after having been called "a clumsy but subtle technician" in a book on contemporary French composers published in 1911.

In addition to his body of music, Satie also left a remarkable set of writings, having contributed work for a range of publications, from the dadaist 391 to the American Vanity Fair. Although in later life he prided himself on always publishing his work under his own name, in the late nineteenth century he appears to have used pseudonyms such as Virginie Lebeau and François de Paule in some of his published writings.

Satie was a colourful figure in the early 20th century Parisian avant-garde. He was a precursor to later artistic movements such as minimalism, repetitive music and the Theatre of the Absurd.
The Gymnopédies, published in Paris starting in 1888, are three piano compositions written by French composer and pianist, Erik Satie.

These short, atmospheric pieces are written in 3/4 time, with each sharing a common theme and structure. Collectively, the Gymnopedies are regarded as the precursors to modern ambient music[citation needed] - gentle yet somewhat eccentric pieces which, when composed, defied the classical tradition. For instance, the first few bars feature a disjunct chordal theme in the bass - first, a G-major 7th in the bass, and then a B-minor chord, also in the lower register. Then comes the one-note theme in D major. Although the collection of chords at first seems too complex to be harmonious, the melody soon imbues the work with a soothing atmospheric quality.

Satie himself used the term "furniture music" to refer to some of his pieces, implying they could be used as mood-setting background music. However, Satie used this term to refer to only some of his later, 20th century compositions, without specific reference to the Gymnopédies as background music. From the second half of the 20th century on, the Gymnopédies were often erroneously described as part of Satie's body of furniture music, perhaps due to John Cage's interpretation of them.
[from Wikipedia]

Artwork:Leonora Carrington "The Temptation of st.Anthony"
Played by:Daniel Varsano, Philippe Entremont

03:25

Erik Satie - Gnossienne No.1

Music moods

  • 0 lượt xem
  • 12 tháng trước
Alfred Eric Leslie Satie (Honfleur, 17 May 1866 -- Paris, 1 July 1925) was a French composer and pianist. Starting with his first composition in 1884, he signed his name as Erik Satie.

Satie was introduced as a "gymnopedist" in 1887, shortly before writing his most famous compositions, the Gymnopédies. Later, he also referred to himself as a "phonometrograph" or "phonometrician" (meaning "someone who measures (and writes down) sounds") preferring this designation to that of "musician," after having been called "a clumsy but subtle technician" in a book on contemporary French composers published in 1911.

In addition to his body of music, Satie also left a remarkable set of writings, having contributed work for a range of publications, from the dadaist 391 to the American Vanity Fair. Although in later life he prided himself on always publishing his work under his own name, in the late nineteenth century he appears to have used pseudonyms such as Virginie Lebeau and François de Paule in some of his published writings.

Satie was a colourful figure in the early 20th century Parisian avant-garde. He was a precursor to later artistic movements such as minimalism, repetitive music and the Theatre of the Absurd.

"Gnossienne" is the name given to several piano pieces by French composer Erik Satie in the late 19th century.
Satie's coining of the word "gnossienne" was one of the rare occasions when a composer used a new term to indicate a new "type" of composition. Satie had and would use many novel names for his compositions; for example, "ogive" had been the name of an architectural element until Satie used it as the name for a composition, the Ogives Similarly with "vexations", "croquis et agaceries" and so on—but "gnossienne" was a word that did not exist before Satie used it to indicate a composition. "Gnossienne" appears to be derived from the word gnosis; Satie was involved in gnostic sects and movements at the time that he began to compose the Gnossiennes. However, some published versions claim that the word derives from Cretan "knossos" or "gnossus" and link the Gnossiennes to Theseus, Ariadne and the Minotaur myth.

The Gnossiennes were composed by Satie in the decade following the composition of the Trois Sarabandes (1887) and the Trois Gymnopédies (1888). Like these Sarabandes and Gymnopédies, the Gnossiennes are often considered dances. It is not certain that this qualification comes from Satie himself—the sarabande and the Gymnopaedia were at least historically known as dances.

The musical vocabulary of the Gnossiennes is a continuation of that of the Gymnopédies (a development that had started with the 1886 Ogives → Sarabandes → Gymnopédies → Gnossiennes) later leading to more harmonic experimentation in compositions like the Danses Gothiques. These series of compositions are all at the core of Satie's characteristic 19th century style, and in this sense differ from his early salon compositions (like the 1885 "Waltz" compositions published in 1887), his turn-of-the-century cabaret compositions (like the Je te Veux Waltz), and his post-Schola Cantorum piano solo compositions, starting with the Préludes flasques in 1912.
[from Wikipedia]

Artwork:Remedios Varo
Played by:Daniel Varsano

02:33

Erik Satie: Gnossienne 4 - Gilbert Garcin

Music moods

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  • 12 tháng trước
The (Trois) Gnossiennes Nos. 4 to 6 were only published in 1968, long after Satie's death. None of these appear to have been numbered, nor even titled as "Gnossienne" by Satie himself. The sequence of these three Gnossiennes in the 1968 publication by Robert Caby does not correspond with the chronological order of composition. It is extremely unlikely that Satie would have seen these compositions as three members of a single set.

Gnossienne No. 4
Lent. Composition date on the manuscript: 22 January 1891.

A facsimile of the four manuscript pages of this composition can be seen on this page of Niclas Fogwall's Satie website.

The fourth Gnossienne is often considered musically the most interesting one. Composed in A minor, it features a bass line centred around an A minor chord IV (Dm), sounding D, A, D, F, A, D, F, D, A, F, D, A, D. The bass part then transposes into a C minor chord I ostinato, following the pattern G, G, C, Eb, G, C, G, C, G, Eb, C, G, C. Section B, usually considered a very inspired section, uses semiquavers to contrast the minor melody of Section A.

Piano: Alexandre Tharaud

Photos by Gilbert Garsin
http://www.gilbert-garcin.com/index.htm

Playlist Satie
http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=4B86A83841002C46

~

More:
http://ckuik.com/Erik_Satie

~

03:28

Fredrika Stahl with band on Swedish Television.

Music moods

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Fredrika Stahl together with Andreas Öberg, Erik Lindeborg, Robert Ikiz and Kristian Lind plays "Ou Veux Tu Aller", an original song by Fredrika Stahl from the album "A Fraction Of You" (Sony/BMG). Website: www.fredrika-stahl.com www.myspace.com/fredrikastahl

03:27

Erik Hassle - Talk About It (Ft. Vic Mensa) (Official Music Video)

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Erik Hassle - Talk About It (Featuring Vic Mensa) (Official Music Video)
From "Somebody's Party EP"
2014 Artist Company TEN, under exclusive License to Sony Music Entertainment

Find it on iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/se/album/somebodys-party-ep/id826728415?l=en

Follow Erik Hassle on Social Media:
https://www.facebook.com/erikhassle
https://twitter.com/erikhassle
http://instagram.com/erikhassle
http://erikhassle.com/

03:17

Bowling For Soup - "S-S-S-Saturday"

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  • 12 tháng trước
Bowling For Soup // "S-S-S-Saturday" // from the album Fishin' For Woos in stores April 26th // Directed by Merritt Fields // Bowling For Soup Pre-Sales available at: http://www.bowlingforsoup.com/ffw

03:17

Bowling For Soup - "S-S-S-Saturday"

vietbigbrother

  • 0 lượt xem
  • 12 tháng trước
Bowling For Soup // "S-S-S-Saturday" // from the album Fishin' For Woos in stores April 26th // Directed by Merritt Fields // Bowling For Soup Pre-Sales available at: http://www.bowlingforsoup.com/ffw