This Is: Glenn Gould

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50 great tracks from 20th century's most celebrated piano genius. Beyond his iconic Bach recordings, you will also find his unique interpretation of Beethoven, Scriabin, Strauss, and many other composers from renaissance to modern age.

Thể loại: Âm nhạc , Artists, Artists, Classical & Opera, Classical & Opera, Rare, Rare

Kênh: Music moods

Thời gian tạo: 12 tháng trước

Cập nhật lần cuối: 4 ngày trước

08:06

Ludwig van Beethoven - Symphony No. 5 in C minor, Op. 67 - I. Allegro con brio

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The Symphony No. 5 in C minor, Op. 67, was written by Ludwig van Beethoven in 1804--08. This symphony is one of the most popular and best-known compositions in all of classical music, and one of the most often played symphonies.[1] It comprises four movements: an opening sonata, an andante, and a fast scherzo which leads attacca to the finale. First performed in Vienna's Theater an der Wien in 1808, the work achieved its prodigious reputation soon afterwards. E. T. A. Hoffmann described the symphony as "one of the most important works of the time". The symphony is scored for piccolo (fourth movement only), 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets in B flat and C, 2 bassoons, contrabassoon (fourth movement only), 2 horns in E flat and C, 2 trumpets, 3 trombones (alto, tenor, and bass, fourth movement only), timpani (in G-C) and strings. First movement: Allegro con brio The first movement opens with the four-note motif discussed above, one of the most famous in western music. There is considerable debate among conductors as to the manner of playing the four opening bars. Some conductors take it in strict allegro tempo; others take the liberty of a weighty treatment, playing the motif in a much slower and more stately tempo; yet others take the motif molto ritardando (a pronounced slowing through each four-note phrase), arguing that the fermata over the fourth note justifies this.Some critics consider it crucial to convey the spirit of and-two-and one, as written, and consider the more common one-two-three-four to be misleading. The first movement is in the traditional sonata form that Beethoven inherited from his classical predecessors, Haydn and Mozart (in which the main ideas that are introduced in the first few pages undergo elaborate development through many keys, with a dramatic return to the opening section—the recapitulation—about three-quarters of the way through). It starts out with two dramatic fortissimo phrases, the famous motif, commanding the listener's attention. Following the first four bars, Beethoven uses imitations and sequences to expand the theme, these pithy imitations tumbling over each other with such rhythmic regularity that they appear to form a single, flowing melody. Shortly after, a very short fortissimo bridge, played by the horns, takes place before a second theme is introduced. This second theme is in E flat major, the relative major, and it is more lyrical, written piano and featuring the four-note motif in the string accompaniment. The codetta is again based on the four-note motif. The development section follows, using modulation, sequences and imitation, and including the bridge. During the recapitulation, there is a brief solo passage for oboe in quasi-improvisatory style, and the movement ends with a massive coda. Conductor: Herbert Blomstedt Orchestra: Staatskapelle Dresden
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33:11

Maurice Ravel - La Valse, poème chorégraphique pour orchestre

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Maurice Ravel - La Valse, poème chorégraphique pour orchestre. The Waltz, a choreographic poem for orchestra, 1919-20. 00:00 I. Part | Maurice Ravel - La Valse ("Ar"; "Fogo"; "Água" e "Terra") 12:05 II. Part | Complete Short-film (Classical Elements: Air | Fire | Water | Earth) Orchestre du Théâtre des Champs-Elysées sob a direcção do maestro Pedro de Freitas Branco, Paris, 1953. Numa sublime reinvenção com a coreografia de Paulo Ribeiro para a Companhia Nacional de Bailado Portuguesa (CNB). Uma Curta Metragem de João Botelho, 2012. MAURICE RAVEL (1875-1937) "The finest ear that ever existed", Claude Debussy. Ballet impresario Serge Diaghilev asked Ravel to write what would become La valse for the Ballets Russes, on a program to be shared with Stravinsky's Pulcinella, and thus was responsible for one of Ravel's most popular orchestral concert works. Ironically, the two-piano "test-drive" reduction of La valse never met with Diaghilev's approval, and so this is the work that precipitated the break between the composer and the producer, whose relations had been strained since disagreements over Daphnis et Chloé. Ravel had for years intended to write some sort of tribute to Johann Strauss II, a Viennese-style waltz on Ravel's own terms. Strauss, had he been alive, would probably have found the result to be gruesome. Ravel's waltz is both nostalgic and sinister, rising from nothing but a vague rhythmic pulse, proceeding through several distinct waltz sequences (much more closely linked thematically than in any Strauss waltz), each culminating in an increasingly powerful crescendo and ending in apocalypse. Along the way come disturbing accelerations and ritards (making this particularly unsuitable for ballroom dancing), dynamic extremes, and eerie glissandi, creating an atmosphere of violence, decadence, and decay. In short, it is a portrait of Vienna (and Europe) in the years surrounding World War I. Ravel's preface in the score hardly hints at any of this: "Drifting clouds give glimpses, through rifts, of couples waltzing. The clouds gradually scatter, and an immense hall can be seen, filled with a whirling crowd. The scene gradually becomes illuminated. The light of chandeliers bursts forth. An imperial court about 1885." Ravel prepared the orchestral version first, but presented the music to Diaghilev in 1920 in a two-piano reduction, which Ravel played with Marcelle Meyer. Diaghilev declared it to be "a masterpiece...but it is not a ballet. It is the portrait of a ballet." He refused to have it choreographed. Stravinsky, who was also present, maintained absolute silence. Ravel gave the first concert performance of the two-piano version in Vienna that year with fellow composer Alfredo Casella. This reduction is very faithful to the orchestral score, right down to the glissandi. Ravel's solo-piano version is extremely difficult, and so it is infrequently played, although it did meet with the approval of Glenn Gould, who rarely bothered with Ravel's other music.
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  • 8 tháng trước

11:19

Glenn Gould: Bach - Toccata in C Minor, BWV 911

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Glenn Herbert Gould (September 25, 1932 -- October 4, 1982) was a Canadian pianist who became one of the best-known and most celebrated classical pianists of the 20th century. He was particularly renowned as an interpreter of the keyboard music of Johann Sebastian Bach. His playing was distinguished by remarkable technical proficiency and capacity to articulate the polyphonic texture of Bach's music. Gould rejected most of the standard Romantic piano literature and, after his adolescence, avoided Liszt, Schumann, and Chopin. Although his recordings were dominated by Bach, Gould's repertoire was diverse, including works by Beethoven, Mozart, Haydn, Brahms, pre-Baroque composers such as Jan Sweelinck, and such 20th-century composers as Paul Hindemith and Arnold Schoenberg. Gould was well known for various eccentricities, from his unorthodox musical interpretations and mannerisms at the keyboard to aspects of his lifestyle and personal behavior. He stopped giving concerts at the age of 31 to concentrate on studio recording and other projects. Gould was also known as a writer, composer, conductor, and broadcaster. He was a prolific contributor to musical journals, in which he discussed music theory and outlined his musical philosophy. His career as a composer was less distinguished. His output was minimal and many projects were left unfinished. There is evidence that, had he lived beyond 50, he intended to abandon the piano and devote the remainder of his career to conducting and other projects. As a broadcaster, Gould was prolific. His output ranged from television and radio broadcasts of studio performances to musique concrète radio documentaries about life in the Canadian wilderness... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glenn_Gould A link to this wonderful artists personal website: http://www.allmusic.com/artist/glenn-gould-mn0000803752/discography Please Enjoy! I send my kind and warm regards,
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